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Unpacking the “Cannes of Worms” at Cannes Lions 2018

30TH JUNE 2018

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Full article published in Creativepool 

Cannes Lions 2018 was a more reserved affair than perhaps we were used to, but it was no less inspiring. Indeed, many found the atmosphere this year to be a little more relaxed and a little more open. Whether this was by happenstance or design, it resulted in a festival that shaved away a lot of the unnecessary pomp and circumstance and focused on the work.

To reflect on what we learned from the festival this year, and what it has still to teach us, Creativepool reached out to those that attended this year. Many seem to agree that this year was very much a year of change for the festival. A transitionary year, if you will.

It's also a year that revealed two pervasive themes; how creativity and technology are becoming inexorably linked, and a genuine drive for change, both societal and within the industry. So, if you didn't manage to make it to Cannes this year and want to digest some of the major takeaways from it, read on...

Richard Dutton, Chief Marketing Officer at Engine, said: 

The glamorous Instagram stories of pool parties and celeb spots may have gone, but what has Cannes Lions 2018 left us to look at longer term? There were a number of key themes that jumped out at this year’s Cannes for me:

1. We need to combine creativity, technology and data to give our clients a competitive advantage, as evidenced by some of the best work we saw at The Palais.

2. We are responsible as an industry for stamping out sexism – both in our work and in our work-place. It was reassuring to hear how so many brands and agencies were taking action.

3. Brands need to disrupt the disruptors – businesses need to look at how they can change within to regain the advantage.

4. Clients are re-looking at how they work with agencies – they want agile agencies that can operate as an ecosystem of specialists. The large, cumbersome holding companies are becoming increasingly undesirable.

Cannes will be back in 2019 – the tech giants will continue to dominate everything from La Croisette to the conversation, and hopefully, we will see a further evolution of how creative, tech and data can work so effectively in unison.

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